Relationship Violence

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Relationship Violence Defined: Many people often think of domestic or relationship violence as physical violence, such as hitting. However, intimate partner violence takes other forms, such as psychological, emotional, or sexual abuse. Relationship violence is about one person in a relationship using a pattern of behaviors to control the other person. It can happen to people who are married or not married; heterosexual, gay, or lesbian; living together, separated, or dating.

Examples of Relationship Violence

– Pushing, hitting, slapping, choking, kicking, or biting – – Threatening you, your children, other family members or pets

– Threatening suicide to get you to do something

– Using or threatening to use a weapon against you

– Keeping/taking your paycheck

– Putting you down or making you feel bad

– Forcing you to have sex or to do sexual acts you do not want or like

– Keeping you from seeing your friends, family or from going to work

Colorado Statistics

– There were 14,123 domestic violence criminal cases filed in the Colorado county courts in 2006. (8)

– Almost half of all murders in Colorado are committed by an intimate partner. The vast majority of these victims are female. (8)

– 41 people died as a result of domestic violence in 2006. Two of the victims were children. (8)

– According to the Colorado Department of Corrections, 85% of incarcerated sex offenders knew the person they victimized.

National Statistics

– One in every four women will experience domestic violence in her lifetime. (1)

– Females who are 20-24 years of age are at the greatest risk for intimate partner violence. (2)

– One in six women and one in 33 men have experienced an attempted or completed rape. (3)

– Almost one-third of female homicide victims that are reported in police records are killed by an intimate partner. (4)

– Nearly 7.8 million women have been raped by an intimate partner at some point in their lives. (5)

– Witnessing violence between one’s parents or caretakers is the strongest risk factor of transmitting violent behavior from one generation to the next. (6)

– The cost of intimate partner violence exceeds $5.8 billion each year, $4.1 billion of which is for direct medical and mental health services. (7)

1) TJADEN, PATRICIA & THOENNES, NANCY. NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF JUSTICE AND THE CENTERS OF DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION, “EXTENT, NATURE AND CONSEQUENCES OF INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE: FINDINGS FROM THE NATIONAL VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN SURVEY,” (2000)
(2) US DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE, BUREAU OF JUSTICE STATISTICS, “INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE IN THE UNITED STATES,” DECEMBER 2006.
(3) US DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE, “PREVALENCE, INCIDENCE, AND CONSEQUENCES OF VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN,” NOVEMBER 1998.
(4) FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION, UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS” CRIME IN THE UNITED STATES, 2000,” (2001).
(5) COSTS OF INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN IN THE UNITED STATES. 2003. CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION, NATIONAL CENTERS FOR INJURY PREVENTION AND CONTROL. ATLANTA, GA.
(6) BREAK THE CYCLE. (2006). STARTLING STATISTICS.HTTP://WWW.BREAKTHECYCLE.ORG.
(7) COST OF INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN IN THE UNITED STATES. 2003. CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION, NATIONAL CENTERS FOR INJURY PREVENTION AND CONTROL. ATLANTA, GA.
(8) COLORADO COALITION AGAINST DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, “FACT SHEET: DOMESTIC VIOLENCE.” RETRIEVED ON OCTOBER 19, 2007, FROM WWW.CCADV.ORG/FACT.HTM.

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